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C2 Proficiency (CPE) >> Multiple Choice Reading Worksheets >> The first of the reading parts in the Reading and Use of English paper in the C2 Proficiency exam is the multiple choice reading comprehension section. A text is followed by 4-option multiple choice questions. This text: A Ghost by Guy De Maupassant.

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Reading Multiple Choice - A Ghost by Guy De Maupassant

Read the text below and then answer questions 1-7 choosing in each case the answer (A, B, C or D) which fits best.

1. How does the Marquis look back on what happened to him?
a) it changed his life
b) it gives him nightmares
c) it is still with him
d) he has mostly forgotten it

2. Why hasn't the Marquis ever told the story before now?
a) he feels ashamed
b) his memory is poor
c) he think he was insane
d) he was too young

3. Why did the narrator's friend look so much older?
a) he had been abroad
b) his hair had turned white
c) he felt suicidal
d) he had suffered greatly

4. Why did the narrator's friend ask him to go to his chateau?
a) because there was some urgent business
b) because he couldn't ask anyone else
c) because the lawyer had insisted
d) because they knew each other so well

5. Why was the narrator offended during his breakfast with his friend?
a) because he felt as though he wasn't trusted
b) because he felt as though he couldn't be relied on to keep a secret
c) because the friend was not very talkative
d) because he wasn't happy about going a long distance to the chateau

6. Which word is closest in meaning to "avidity" in the third to last paragraph?
a) knowledge
b) eagerness
c) power
d) consideration

7. Why did the narrator feel angry about the letter being sealed?
a) his instructions were in the sealed letter
b) it made his errand more mysterious
c) he felt he wasn't trusted
d) he wanted to read what was inside

A Ghost

By Guy De Maupassant

We were speaking of sequestration, alluding to a recent lawsuit. It was at the close of a friendly evening in a very old mansion in the Rue de Grenelle, and each of the guests had a story to tell, which he assured us was true. Then the old Marquis de la Tour-Samuel, eighty-two years of age, rose and came forward to lean on the mantelpiece. He told the following story in his slightly quavering voice:

I, also, have witnessed a strange thing, so strange that it has been the nightmare of my life. It happened fifty-six years ago, and yet there is not a month when I do not see it again in my dreams. From that day I have borne a mark, a stamp of fear, do you understand?

Yes, for ten minutes I was a prey to terror, in such a way that ever since a constant dread has remained in my soul. Unexpected sounds chill me to the heart; objects which I can ill distinguish in the evening shadows make me long to flee. I am afraid at night.

No! I would not have owned up to such a thing before reaching my present age. But now I may tell everything. One may fear imaginary dangers at eighty-two years old. But before actual danger I have never turned back, mesdames.

That affair so upset my mind, filled me with such a deep, mysterious unrest that I never could tell it. I kept it in that inmost part, that corner where we conceal our sad, our shameful secrets, all the weaknesses of our life which cannot be confessed.

I will tell you that strange happening just as it took place, with no attempt to explain it. Unless I went mad for one short hour it must be explainable, though. Yet I was not mad, and I will prove it to you. Imagine what you will. Here are the simple facts:

It was in 1827, in July. I was quartered with my regiment in Rouen. One day, as I was strolling on the quay, I came across a man I believed I recognized, though I could not place him with certainty. I instinctively went more slowly, ready to pause. The stranger saw my impulse, looked at me, and fell into my arms.

It was a friend of my younger days, of whom I had been very fond. He seemed to have become half a century older in the five years since I had seen him. His hair was white, and he stooped in his walk, as if he were exhausted. He understood my amazement and told me the story of his life. A terrible event had broken him down. He had fallen madly in love with a young girl and married her in a kind of dreamlike ecstasy. After a year of unalloyed bliss and unexhausted passion, she had died suddenly of heart disease, no doubt killed by love itself.

He had left the country on the very day of her funeral, and had come to live in his hotel at Rouen. He remained there, solitary and desperate, grief slowly mining him, so wretched that he constantly thought of suicide. 'As I thus came across you again,' he said, 'I shall ask a great favor of you. I want you to go to my château and get some papers I urgently need. They are in the writing-desk of my room, of our room. I cannot send a servant or a lawyer, as the errand must be kept private. I want absolute silence.

'I shall give you the key of the room, which I locked carefully myself before leaving, and the key to the writing-desk. I shall also give you a note for the gardener, who will let you in. 'Come to breakfast with me to-morrow, and we'll talk the matter over.'

I promised to render him that slight service. It would mean but a pleasant excursion for me, his home not being more than twenty-five miles from Rouen. I could go there in an hour on horseback. At ten o'clock the next day I was with him. We breakfasted alone together, yet he did not utter more than twenty words. He asked me to excuse him. The thought that I was going to visit the room where his happiness lay shattered, upset him, he said. Indeed, he seemed perturbed, worried, as if some mysterious struggle were taking place in his soul.

At last he explained exactly what I was to do. It was very simple. I was to take two packages of letters and some papers, locked in the first drawer on the right of the desk of which I had the key. He added: 'I need not ask you not to glance at them.'

I was almost hurt by his words, and told him so, rather sharply. He stammered: 'Forgive me. I suffer so much!' And tears came to his eyes.

I left about one o'clock to accomplish my errand. The day was radiant, and I rushed through the meadows, listening to the song of the larks, and the rhythmical beat of my sword on my riding-boots. Then I entered the forest, and I set my horse to walking. Branches of the trees softly caressed my face, and now and then I would catch a leaf between my teeth and bite it with avidity, full of the joy of life, such as fills you without reason, with a tumultuous happiness almost indefinable, a kind of magical strength.

As I neared the house I took out the letter for the gardener, and noted with surprise that it was sealed. I was so amazed and so annoyed that I almost turned back without fulfilling my mission. Then I thought that I should thus display over-sensitiveness and bad taste. My friend might have sealed it unconsciously, worried as he was.

The manor looked as though it had been deserted the last twenty years. The gate, wide-open and rotten, held, one wondered how. Grass filled the paths; you could not tell the flower-beds from the lawn.

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